For information about radiation exposure and medical imaging click here.

Fluoroscopy is an x-ray procedure that makes it possible to see internal organs in motion. Fluoroscopy uses x-ray to produce real-time video images. After the x-rays pass through the patient, instead of using film, they are captured by a device called an image intensifier and converted into light. The light is then captured by a TV camera and displayed on a video monitor.

 


Help Center

Why would my physician order a Fluoroscopy?
How should I prepare for my Fluoroscopy?
What should I expect during this exam?
What will I experience during the procedure?
When and how will I find the results of my test?
Are there any health risks associated with Fluoroscopy?


Why would my physician order a Fluoroscopy?

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Fluoroscopy is used to evaluate the gastrointestinal tract for reflux, hernias, ulcers, polyps, cancer or other diseases. Fluoroscopy can also be used to assist the physician performing joint injections.

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How should I prepare for my Fluoroscopy?

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Many studies are performed utilizing fluoroscopy, including but not limited to:
  • Esophogram (Barium swallow) - a study of the throat
  • Upper GI series - a study of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum (first portion of the small intestine)
  • Small bowel series - a study of the stomach and entire small intestine
  • Lower GI (Barium enema) - a study of the colon
  • Intravenous Pyelography (IVP) - a study of the kidneys, ureters, and bladder
  • Arthrogram - a study of the shoulder, wrist, and hip joints showing ligament and meniscal tears
Preparation varies depending on the type of study performed. Upper GI requires an empty stomach, whereas a barium enema requires a special colon prep. Your physician will provide you with detailed prep instructions at the time your test is scheduled. You should inform your physician about any recent illnesses or other medical conditions, as well as allergies you might have to medications. Women should always inform the technologist if there is any possibility that they are pregnant.

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What should I expect during this exam?

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Depending on the type of fluoroscopy test you undergo you will lie down on an x-ray table equipped with what is called an image intensifier - a device that creates an image of the x-rayed body part on a TV monitor that the radiologist views. You may be repositioned frequently to enable the radiologist to technologist to capture different views.

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What will I experience during the procedure?

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Fluoroscopy itself is painless. Some patients find oral barium (Upper GI) unpleasant but tolerable. Some patients find the barium enema uncomfortable but tolerable.

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When and how will I find the results of my test?

One of our on-site radiologists will analyze the images and send a report to your referring physician. Your referring physician will follow-up with you regarding your results.

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Are there any health risks associated with Fluoroscopy?

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During the study you will be exposed to a very low dose of x-ray radiation. The technologist and radiologist will make every effort to limit the dose of radiation you receive. The risk from this amount of radiation is very low and is far exceeded by the benefits of the information learned by the study. If you are pregnant, you may not be able to have some fluoroscopy exams.

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